Several Levilactobacillus brevis strains have the potential to be used as probiotics since they provide health benefits due to the interaction of live cells, and of their secreted products, with the host (tissues). Therefore, the development of simple fermentation processes that improve cell viability to reduce industrial production costs, and at the same time the characterization and biological evaluation of cell-free postbiotics that can further promote application, are of great interest. In the present study, small scale batch fermentations on semi defined media, deprived of animal derived raw materials, were used to optimize growth of L. brevis SP48, reaching 1.2 ± 0.4 × 1010 CFU/ml of viable cells after 16 h of growth. Displacement, competition, and inhibition assays compared the effect, on Helicobacter pylori, of L. brevis cells to that of its partially purified potentially postbiotic fraction rich in exopolysaccharides and proteins. The expression of pro and anti-inflammatory biochemical markers indicated that both samples activated antimicrobial defenses and innate immunity in a gastric model. Moreover, these compounds also acted as modulators of the inflammatory response in a gut in vitro model. These data demonstrate that the high molecular weight compounds secreted by L. brevis SP48 can contrast H. pylori and reduce inflammation related to intestinal bowel disease, potentially overcoming issues related to the preservation of probiotic viability.

Probiotics are living microorganisms that give beneficial health effects while consumed, and each strain possesses diverse and unique properties and also different technological characteristics that affect its ability to be produced at large scale. Limosilactobacillus fermentum is a widely studied member of probiotics, however, few data are available on the development of fermentation and downstream processes for the production of viable biomasses for potential industrial applications. In the present study a novel L. fermentum strain was isolated from buffalo milk and used as test example for biotechnological process development. The strain was able to produce up to 109 CFU/mL on a (glucose based) semi-defined medium deprived of animal-derived raw materials up to the pilot scale (150 L), demonstrating improved results compared to commonly used, although industrially not suitable, media rich of casein and beef extract. The study of strain behavior in batch experiments indicated that the highest concentration of viable cells was reached after only 8 h of growth, greatly shortening the process. Moreover, initial concentrations of glucose in the medium above 30 g/L, if not supported by higher nitrogen concentrations, reduced the yield of biomass and increased production of heterolactic fermentation by-products. Biomass concentration via microfiltration on hollow fibers, and subsequent spray-drying allowed to recover about 5.7 × 1010CFU/gpowder of viable cells, indicating strain resistance to harsh processing conditions. Overall, these data demonstrate the possibility to obtain and maintain adequate levels of viable L. fermentum cells by using a simple approach that is potentially suitable for industrial development. Moreover, since often exopolysaccharides produced by lactobacilli contribute to the strain's functionality, a partial characterization of the EPS produced by the newly identified L. fermentum strain was carried out. Finally, the effect of L. fermentum versus H. pylori in a gastric epithelial cell model was evaluated demonstrating its ability to stimulate the response of the immune system and displace the infective agent.

Optimization of growth of Levilactobacillus brevis SP 48 and in vitro evaluation of the effect of viable cells and high molecular weight potential postbiotics on Helicobacter pylori

Cimini, Donatella
;
Stellavato, Antonietta;Dabous, Azza;Donnarumma, Giovanna;Schiraldi, Chiara
2022

Abstract

Probiotics are living microorganisms that give beneficial health effects while consumed, and each strain possesses diverse and unique properties and also different technological characteristics that affect its ability to be produced at large scale. Limosilactobacillus fermentum is a widely studied member of probiotics, however, few data are available on the development of fermentation and downstream processes for the production of viable biomasses for potential industrial applications. In the present study a novel L. fermentum strain was isolated from buffalo milk and used as test example for biotechnological process development. The strain was able to produce up to 109 CFU/mL on a (glucose based) semi-defined medium deprived of animal-derived raw materials up to the pilot scale (150 L), demonstrating improved results compared to commonly used, although industrially not suitable, media rich of casein and beef extract. The study of strain behavior in batch experiments indicated that the highest concentration of viable cells was reached after only 8 h of growth, greatly shortening the process. Moreover, initial concentrations of glucose in the medium above 30 g/L, if not supported by higher nitrogen concentrations, reduced the yield of biomass and increased production of heterolactic fermentation by-products. Biomass concentration via microfiltration on hollow fibers, and subsequent spray-drying allowed to recover about 5.7 × 1010CFU/gpowder of viable cells, indicating strain resistance to harsh processing conditions. Overall, these data demonstrate the possibility to obtain and maintain adequate levels of viable L. fermentum cells by using a simple approach that is potentially suitable for industrial development. Moreover, since often exopolysaccharides produced by lactobacilli contribute to the strain's functionality, a partial characterization of the EPS produced by the newly identified L. fermentum strain was carried out. Finally, the effect of L. fermentum versus H. pylori in a gastric epithelial cell model was evaluated demonstrating its ability to stimulate the response of the immune system and displace the infective agent.
2022
Several Levilactobacillus brevis strains have the potential to be used as probiotics since they provide health benefits due to the interaction of live cells, and of their secreted products, with the host (tissues). Therefore, the development of simple fermentation processes that improve cell viability to reduce industrial production costs, and at the same time the characterization and biological evaluation of cell-free postbiotics that can further promote application, are of great interest. In the present study, small scale batch fermentations on semi defined media, deprived of animal derived raw materials, were used to optimize growth of L. brevis SP48, reaching 1.2 ± 0.4 × 1010 CFU/ml of viable cells after 16 h of growth. Displacement, competition, and inhibition assays compared the effect, on Helicobacter pylori, of L. brevis cells to that of its partially purified potentially postbiotic fraction rich in exopolysaccharides and proteins. The expression of pro and anti-inflammatory biochemical markers indicated that both samples activated antimicrobial defenses and innate immunity in a gastric model. Moreover, these compounds also acted as modulators of the inflammatory response in a gut in vitro model. These data demonstrate that the high molecular weight compounds secreted by L. brevis SP48 can contrast H. pylori and reduce inflammation related to intestinal bowel disease, potentially overcoming issues related to the preservation of probiotic viability.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/482788
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