Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an early prominent deficit of visual functions associated with signs and symptoms that are the expression of dysfunction of posterior brain regions. Although PCA is commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in recent years new pathological substrates have emerged. Among them, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the most commonly reported but, to date, little is known about the clinical features of PCA due to FTLD. We conducted a systematic search in the main biomedical database MEDLINE. We searched for all clinical PCA reports that assessed the pathological basis of such syndrome with at least one of the following: (1) neuropathological examination, (2) cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, (3) amyloid-PET imaging and (4) genetic testing. Of 369 potentially eligible studies, 40 fulfilled the inclusion criteria with an overall number of 144 patients (127 PCA-AD vs. 17 PCA-FTD/non-AD). We found that hallucinations/illusions were present in none of the probable PCA-FTD/non-AD subjects while were reported in 15 out of 97 PCA-AD individuals. Optic ataxia and Parkinsonism showed a significantly greater prevalence in probable PCA FTD/non-AD than in PCA-AD whereas myoclonus and disorientation in time and space were significantly more frequent in PCA-AD than in probable PCA FTD/non-AD. We also found a predominance of a left-side pattern of atrophy/hypometabolism in the probable PCA FTD/non-AD. Clinical features such as optic ataxia, Parkinsonism, myoclonus, hallucinations and disorientation in time and space suggest the underlying pathological basis of PCA and help in leading the diagnostic protocol consequently.

Is the pathology of posterior cortical atrophy clinically predictable?

Cipriano L.;Oliva M.;Puoti G.;Signoriello E.;Bonavita S.;Coppola C.
Writing – Review & Editing
2022

Abstract

Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by an early prominent deficit of visual functions associated with signs and symptoms that are the expression of dysfunction of posterior brain regions. Although PCA is commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in recent years new pathological substrates have emerged. Among them, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the most commonly reported but, to date, little is known about the clinical features of PCA due to FTLD. We conducted a systematic search in the main biomedical database MEDLINE. We searched for all clinical PCA reports that assessed the pathological basis of such syndrome with at least one of the following: (1) neuropathological examination, (2) cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, (3) amyloid-PET imaging and (4) genetic testing. Of 369 potentially eligible studies, 40 fulfilled the inclusion criteria with an overall number of 144 patients (127 PCA-AD vs. 17 PCA-FTD/non-AD). We found that hallucinations/illusions were present in none of the probable PCA-FTD/non-AD subjects while were reported in 15 out of 97 PCA-AD individuals. Optic ataxia and Parkinsonism showed a significantly greater prevalence in probable PCA FTD/non-AD than in PCA-AD whereas myoclonus and disorientation in time and space were significantly more frequent in PCA-AD than in probable PCA FTD/non-AD. We also found a predominance of a left-side pattern of atrophy/hypometabolism in the probable PCA FTD/non-AD. Clinical features such as optic ataxia, Parkinsonism, myoclonus, hallucinations and disorientation in time and space suggest the underlying pathological basis of PCA and help in leading the diagnostic protocol consequently.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/473191
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