SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase, is the most well-studied member of class III histone deacetylases. Due to its wide range of activities and substrate targets, this enzyme has emerged as a major regulator of different physiological processes. However, SIRT1-mediated alterations are also implicated in the pathogenesis of several conditions, including metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Current evidence highlights the potential role of SIRT1 as an attractive therapeutic target for disease prevention and treatment strategies, thus propelling the development of new pharmacological agents. By high-throughput screening of a large library of compounds, we identified SCIC2 as an effective SIRT1 activator. This small molecule showed enzymatic activity of 135.8% at 10 μM, an AC50 value of 50 ± 1.8 µM, and bound SIRT1 with a KD of 26.4 ± 0.6 μM. In order to potentiate its SIRT1-activating ability, SCIC2 was subjected to modelling studies, leading to the identification of a more potent derivative, SCIC2.1. SCIC2.1 displayed higher SIRT1 activity (175%; AC50 = 36.83 ± 2.23 µM), stronger binding to SIRT1, and greater cell permeability than SCIC2. At cellular level, both molecules did not alter the cell cycle progression of cancer cells and normal cells, and were able to strengthen SIRT1-mediated effects in stress response. Finally, SCIC2 and SCIC2.1 attenuated induction of senescence by reducing senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Our findings warrant further investigation of these two novel SIRT1 activators in in vivo and human studies.

SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase, is the most well-studied member of class III histone deacetylases. Due to its wide range of activities and substrate targets, this enzyme has emerged as a major regulator of different physiological processes. However, SIRT1-mediated alterations are also implicated in the pathogenesis of several conditions, including metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Current evidence highlights the potential role of SIRT1 as an attractive therapeutic target for disease prevention and treatment strategies, thus propelling the development of new pharmacological agents. By high-throughput screening of a large library of compounds, we identified SCIC2 as an effective SIRT1 activator. This small molecule showed enzymatic activity of 135.8% at 10 μM, an AC50 value of 50 ± 1.8 µM, and bound SIRT1 with a KD of 26.4 ± 0.6 μM. In order to potentiate its SIRT1-activating ability, SCIC2 was subjected to modelling studies, leading to the identification of a more potent derivative, SCIC2.1. SCIC2.1 displayed higher SIRT1 activity (175%; AC50 = 36.83 ± 2.23 µM), stronger binding to SIRT1, and greater cell permeability than SCIC2. At cellular level, both molecules did not alter the cell cycle progression of cancer cells and normal cells, and were able to strengthen SIRT1-mediated effects in stress response. Finally, SCIC2 and SCIC2.1 attenuated induction of senescence by reducing senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Our findings warrant further investigation of these two novel SIRT1 activators in in vivo and human studies.

Two novel SIRT1 activators, SCIC2 and SCIC2.1, enhance SIRT1-mediated effects in stress response and senescence

Scisciola, Lucia;Carafa, Vincenzo;Cosconati, Sandro;Di Maro, Salvatore;De Angelis, Antonella;Stiuso, Paola;Altucci, Lucia;Nebbioso, Angela
2020

Abstract

SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase, is the most well-studied member of class III histone deacetylases. Due to its wide range of activities and substrate targets, this enzyme has emerged as a major regulator of different physiological processes. However, SIRT1-mediated alterations are also implicated in the pathogenesis of several conditions, including metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Current evidence highlights the potential role of SIRT1 as an attractive therapeutic target for disease prevention and treatment strategies, thus propelling the development of new pharmacological agents. By high-throughput screening of a large library of compounds, we identified SCIC2 as an effective SIRT1 activator. This small molecule showed enzymatic activity of 135.8% at 10 μM, an AC50 value of 50 ± 1.8 µM, and bound SIRT1 with a KD of 26.4 ± 0.6 μM. In order to potentiate its SIRT1-activating ability, SCIC2 was subjected to modelling studies, leading to the identification of a more potent derivative, SCIC2.1. SCIC2.1 displayed higher SIRT1 activity (175%; AC50 = 36.83 ± 2.23 µM), stronger binding to SIRT1, and greater cell permeability than SCIC2. At cellular level, both molecules did not alter the cell cycle progression of cancer cells and normal cells, and were able to strengthen SIRT1-mediated effects in stress response. Finally, SCIC2 and SCIC2.1 attenuated induction of senescence by reducing senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Our findings warrant further investigation of these two novel SIRT1 activators in in vivo and human studies.
SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase, is the most well-studied member of class III histone deacetylases. Due to its wide range of activities and substrate targets, this enzyme has emerged as a major regulator of different physiological processes. However, SIRT1-mediated alterations are also implicated in the pathogenesis of several conditions, including metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Current evidence highlights the potential role of SIRT1 as an attractive therapeutic target for disease prevention and treatment strategies, thus propelling the development of new pharmacological agents. By high-throughput screening of a large library of compounds, we identified SCIC2 as an effective SIRT1 activator. This small molecule showed enzymatic activity of 135.8% at 10 μM, an AC50 value of 50 ± 1.8 µM, and bound SIRT1 with a KD of 26.4 ± 0.6 μM. In order to potentiate its SIRT1-activating ability, SCIC2 was subjected to modelling studies, leading to the identification of a more potent derivative, SCIC2.1. SCIC2.1 displayed higher SIRT1 activity (175%; AC50 = 36.83 ± 2.23 µM), stronger binding to SIRT1, and greater cell permeability than SCIC2. At cellular level, both molecules did not alter the cell cycle progression of cancer cells and normal cells, and were able to strengthen SIRT1-mediated effects in stress response. Finally, SCIC2 and SCIC2.1 attenuated induction of senescence by reducing senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Our findings warrant further investigation of these two novel SIRT1 activators in in vivo and human studies.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/421788
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