Trait-related impulsiveness is highly prevalent in patients with mood disorders, being associated with negative outcomes. The predictive role of affective temperaments on trait-related impulsivity is still understudied. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between impulsivity and affective temperaments in a sample of euthymic patients with mood disorders. This is a real-world multicentric observational study, carried out at the outpatient units of seven university sites in Italy. All patients filled in the short version of Munster Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. The study sample included 653 participants, mainly female (58.2%), with a mean age of 46.9 (+/- 14.1). Regression analyses showed that higher levels of trait-related impulsivity were associated to suicide attempts (p < 0.000), the presence of psychotic symptoms during acute phases (p < 0.05), a seasonal pattern (p < 0.05), a lower age at onset of the disorder (p < 0.05), cyclothymic (p < 0.01) and irritable temperaments (p < 0.01). The results of our study highlight the importance to screen patients with mood disorders for impulsivity and affective temperaments in order to identify patients who are more likely to present a worse outcome and to develop personalized and integrated early pharmacological and psychosocial treatment plans. Novelties of the present paper include the recruitment of patients in a stable phase, which reduced possible bias in patients' self-reports, and the multicentric nature of the study, resulting in the recruitment of a large sample of patients with mood disorders, geographically distributed across Italy, thus improving the generalizability of study results.

Trait-Related Impulsivity, Affective Temperaments and Mood Disorders: Results from a Real-World Multicentric Study

Luciano, Mario;Sampogna, Gaia;Fiorillo, Andrea
2022

Abstract

Trait-related impulsiveness is highly prevalent in patients with mood disorders, being associated with negative outcomes. The predictive role of affective temperaments on trait-related impulsivity is still understudied. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between impulsivity and affective temperaments in a sample of euthymic patients with mood disorders. This is a real-world multicentric observational study, carried out at the outpatient units of seven university sites in Italy. All patients filled in the short version of Munster Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. The study sample included 653 participants, mainly female (58.2%), with a mean age of 46.9 (+/- 14.1). Regression analyses showed that higher levels of trait-related impulsivity were associated to suicide attempts (p < 0.000), the presence of psychotic symptoms during acute phases (p < 0.05), a seasonal pattern (p < 0.05), a lower age at onset of the disorder (p < 0.05), cyclothymic (p < 0.01) and irritable temperaments (p < 0.01). The results of our study highlight the importance to screen patients with mood disorders for impulsivity and affective temperaments in order to identify patients who are more likely to present a worse outcome and to develop personalized and integrated early pharmacological and psychosocial treatment plans. Novelties of the present paper include the recruitment of patients in a stable phase, which reduced possible bias in patients' self-reports, and the multicentric nature of the study, resulting in the recruitment of a large sample of patients with mood disorders, geographically distributed across Italy, thus improving the generalizability of study results.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/485930
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