Simple Summary Patients with oligometastatic urothelial carcinoma represent a challenging subset of subjects to manage. Herein we summarized evidence about the role of metastasis-directed radiation therapy in this clinical setting. Available preliminary evidence supports the role of metastasis-directed radiation therapy as a safe and efficacious option as it has the potential to facilitate local disease control and overall survival. However, in the absence of data from high-quality trials, definitive recommendations cannot be provided, and patients should be counseled on an individual basis. The management of patients with oligometastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) represents an evolving field in uro-oncology, and the role of metastasis-directed therapies, including metastasectomy and metastasis-directed radiation therapy (MDRT), is gaining increasing attention. Herein, we summarize available evidence about the role of MDRT with consolidative intent in oligometastatic UC patients. A systematic review was performed in December 2021. Six studies involving 158 patients were identified. Most patients (n = 120, 90.2%) had a history of bladder cancer and the most frequent sites of metastases were lymph nodes (n= 61, 52.1%) followed by the lungs (n = 34, 29%). Overall, 144 metastases were treated with MDRT. Median follow-up ranged from 17.2 to 25 months. Local control rates ranged from 57% to 100%. Median Overall Survival (OS) ranged from 14.9 to 51.0 months and median progression-free survival ranged from 2.9 to 10.1 months. Rates of OS at one and two years ranged from 78.9% to 96% and from 26% to 63%, respectively. Treatment-related toxicity was recorded in few patients and in most cases a low-grade toxicity was evident. MDRT with consolidative intent represents a potential treatment option for selected patients with oligometastatic UC.

Metastasis-Directed Radiation Therapy with Consolidative Intent for Oligometastatic Urothelial Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Fusco, Ferdinando;Sagnelli, Caterina;
2022

Abstract

Simple Summary Patients with oligometastatic urothelial carcinoma represent a challenging subset of subjects to manage. Herein we summarized evidence about the role of metastasis-directed radiation therapy in this clinical setting. Available preliminary evidence supports the role of metastasis-directed radiation therapy as a safe and efficacious option as it has the potential to facilitate local disease control and overall survival. However, in the absence of data from high-quality trials, definitive recommendations cannot be provided, and patients should be counseled on an individual basis. The management of patients with oligometastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) represents an evolving field in uro-oncology, and the role of metastasis-directed therapies, including metastasectomy and metastasis-directed radiation therapy (MDRT), is gaining increasing attention. Herein, we summarize available evidence about the role of MDRT with consolidative intent in oligometastatic UC patients. A systematic review was performed in December 2021. Six studies involving 158 patients were identified. Most patients (n = 120, 90.2%) had a history of bladder cancer and the most frequent sites of metastases were lymph nodes (n= 61, 52.1%) followed by the lungs (n = 34, 29%). Overall, 144 metastases were treated with MDRT. Median follow-up ranged from 17.2 to 25 months. Local control rates ranged from 57% to 100%. Median Overall Survival (OS) ranged from 14.9 to 51.0 months and median progression-free survival ranged from 2.9 to 10.1 months. Rates of OS at one and two years ranged from 78.9% to 96% and from 26% to 63%, respectively. Treatment-related toxicity was recorded in few patients and in most cases a low-grade toxicity was evident. MDRT with consolidative intent represents a potential treatment option for selected patients with oligometastatic UC.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/483617
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact