Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are an inherited heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders characterized by an abnormal collagen synthesis affecting skin, ligaments, joints, blood vessels, and other organs. It is one of the oldest known causes of bruising and bleeding, and it was described first by Hippocrates in 400 BC. In the last years, multiple gene variants involved in the pathogenesis of specific EDS subtypes have been identified; moreover, new clinical diagnostic criteria have been established. New classification models have also been studied in order to differentiate overlapping conditions. Moreover, EDS shares many characteristics with other similar disorders. Although distinguishing between these seemingly identical conditions is difficult, it is essential in ensuring proper patient care. Currently, there are many genetic and molecular studies underway to clarify the etiology of some variants of EDS. However, the genetic basis of the hypermobile type of EDS (hEDS) is still unknown. In this review, we focused on the study of two of the most common forms of EDS—classic and hypermobile—by trying to identify possible biomarkers that could be of great help to confirm patients’ diagnosis and their follow up.

Biomarkers for ehlers-danlos syndromes: There is a role?

Jannelli E.;
2021

Abstract

Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are an inherited heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders characterized by an abnormal collagen synthesis affecting skin, ligaments, joints, blood vessels, and other organs. It is one of the oldest known causes of bruising and bleeding, and it was described first by Hippocrates in 400 BC. In the last years, multiple gene variants involved in the pathogenesis of specific EDS subtypes have been identified; moreover, new clinical diagnostic criteria have been established. New classification models have also been studied in order to differentiate overlapping conditions. Moreover, EDS shares many characteristics with other similar disorders. Although distinguishing between these seemingly identical conditions is difficult, it is essential in ensuring proper patient care. Currently, there are many genetic and molecular studies underway to clarify the etiology of some variants of EDS. However, the genetic basis of the hypermobile type of EDS (hEDS) is still unknown. In this review, we focused on the study of two of the most common forms of EDS—classic and hypermobile—by trying to identify possible biomarkers that could be of great help to confirm patients’ diagnosis and their follow up.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/467957
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