Metabolic bone disorders are one of the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestations in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that might result in an increase of skeletal fragility and risk of fracture. These disorders are a consequence of bone–gut crosstalk alterations, particularly due to inflammation, which involves the RANK-RANKL-Osteoprotegerin (OPG) pathway. This cross-sectional study investigates the role of serum OPG on bone health in IBD patients. In all patients, we carried out BMD measurements at the lumbar spine and femoral neck by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and evaluation of serum OPG, 25(OH)D, and PTH. We also divided all IBD patients into two groups: group 1 consisted of premenopausal women and men younger than 50 years old, while group 2 included postmenopausal women and men aged more than 50 years old. We enrolled 36 UC patients (51%), 34 CD patients (49%), and 70 healthy controls. IBD group mean age was 44 ± 17.3 years old, with a mean disease duration of 6 years. IBD patients had a mean value of OPG of 48.1 ± 26.64 pg/mL, while mean OPG in the control group was 61.35 ± 47.19 pg/mL (p < 0.05). In group 1, there was a correlation between BMD Z-scores at the lumbar spine and femoral neck and mean OPG levels in UC subjects (r = 0.47 and r = −0.21, respectively; p < 0.05), and only between Z-score at the lumbar spine and OPG level in the CD group (r = 0.83, p < 0.05). For the patients of group 2, we report a statistically significant correlation between T-score measured at the lumbar site in both UC and CD patients (r = −0.79 and r = 0.77, respectively; p < 0.05). In our study, we demonstrated serum OPG levels to be significantly decreased in IBD subjects compared to healthy age-matched individuals. However, according to our data, it seems that the measurement of serum OPG levels is not useful to better define metabolic bone disorders in IBD patients.

Bone Alterations in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Role of Osteoprotegerin

Kateryna Priadko;Antimo Moretti
;
Giovanni Iolascon;Antonietta Gerarda Gravina;Cristiana De Musis;Marco Romano;Francesca Gimigliano
2022

Abstract

Metabolic bone disorders are one of the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestations in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that might result in an increase of skeletal fragility and risk of fracture. These disorders are a consequence of bone–gut crosstalk alterations, particularly due to inflammation, which involves the RANK-RANKL-Osteoprotegerin (OPG) pathway. This cross-sectional study investigates the role of serum OPG on bone health in IBD patients. In all patients, we carried out BMD measurements at the lumbar spine and femoral neck by the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and evaluation of serum OPG, 25(OH)D, and PTH. We also divided all IBD patients into two groups: group 1 consisted of premenopausal women and men younger than 50 years old, while group 2 included postmenopausal women and men aged more than 50 years old. We enrolled 36 UC patients (51%), 34 CD patients (49%), and 70 healthy controls. IBD group mean age was 44 ± 17.3 years old, with a mean disease duration of 6 years. IBD patients had a mean value of OPG of 48.1 ± 26.64 pg/mL, while mean OPG in the control group was 61.35 ± 47.19 pg/mL (p < 0.05). In group 1, there was a correlation between BMD Z-scores at the lumbar spine and femoral neck and mean OPG levels in UC subjects (r = 0.47 and r = −0.21, respectively; p < 0.05), and only between Z-score at the lumbar spine and OPG level in the CD group (r = 0.83, p < 0.05). For the patients of group 2, we report a statistically significant correlation between T-score measured at the lumbar site in both UC and CD patients (r = −0.79 and r = 0.77, respectively; p < 0.05). In our study, we demonstrated serum OPG levels to be significantly decreased in IBD subjects compared to healthy age-matched individuals. However, according to our data, it seems that the measurement of serum OPG levels is not useful to better define metabolic bone disorders in IBD patients.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/467474
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