Background: Some studies showed encouraging results on the efficacy and safety of penile traction therapy after Peyronie's disease (PD) surgery. The early traction therapy (ETT) could be an effective and safe approach to minimize penile shortening in patients undergoing PD surgery. Aim: To evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a novel penile splint as ETT in patients with PD undergoing grafting techniques. Methods: Patients with PD underwent plaque incision and grafting technique; at the end of the procedure, a novel penile splint (ETT) was applied to all patient. The device consisted of 2 10CH intubating stylets, self-adapted to each patient, that kept the penis stretched with the aid of non-absorbable sutures. The total expense for the materials needed to build each penile splint was less than 15 euros. This active traction was maintained for 1-3 weeks; then, we removed the stitches leaving the device on-site for a passive traction. Within 3-4 weeks from surgery, the penile splint was replaced by a standard penile traction device. Outcomes: The main outcomes evaluated at 6 months included stretched penile length (SPL), penile curvature, International Index of Erectile Function-erectile function (IIEF-EF) domain, patient satisfaction, and time to first satisfactory sexual intercourse. Results: A total of 46 patients were enrolled. The median preoperative IIEF-EF, penile curvature, and SPL were 27 points, 70 degrees, and 13 cm, respectively. The median follow-up was 15 months. The median postoperative IIEF-EF was 25 points (P < .001). The median residual penile curvature was 10 degrees (P < .001). The median postoperative SPL was 13 cm (P = .269). 8 patients (17.4%) lost 1 cm of SPL; no shortening greater than 1 cm was recorded. The median time to first satisfactory sexual intercourse and patient satisfaction score was 6 weeks and 9 points, respectively. Clinical Implications: Our results could pave the way for a new line of research, which in turn could lead to an improvement in the postoperative management of the patient undergoing surgery for PD. Strength & Limitations: This is the first study evaluating the ETT after PD surgery. The main limitation of this study is the lack of a randomized control group. Other weaknesses are the small sample size and the short follow-up time. Conclusion: Our novel penile splint is inexpensive, easy to assemble, and adaptable to the patient. ETT using this novel device, followed by standard traction therapy, seems to be feasible, effective, and safe. Copyright (C) 2020, International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

A Novel Penile Splint as Early Traction Therapy After Grafting Techniques for Peyronie's Disease

Manfredi C;
2020

Abstract

Background: Some studies showed encouraging results on the efficacy and safety of penile traction therapy after Peyronie's disease (PD) surgery. The early traction therapy (ETT) could be an effective and safe approach to minimize penile shortening in patients undergoing PD surgery. Aim: To evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a novel penile splint as ETT in patients with PD undergoing grafting techniques. Methods: Patients with PD underwent plaque incision and grafting technique; at the end of the procedure, a novel penile splint (ETT) was applied to all patient. The device consisted of 2 10CH intubating stylets, self-adapted to each patient, that kept the penis stretched with the aid of non-absorbable sutures. The total expense for the materials needed to build each penile splint was less than 15 euros. This active traction was maintained for 1-3 weeks; then, we removed the stitches leaving the device on-site for a passive traction. Within 3-4 weeks from surgery, the penile splint was replaced by a standard penile traction device. Outcomes: The main outcomes evaluated at 6 months included stretched penile length (SPL), penile curvature, International Index of Erectile Function-erectile function (IIEF-EF) domain, patient satisfaction, and time to first satisfactory sexual intercourse. Results: A total of 46 patients were enrolled. The median preoperative IIEF-EF, penile curvature, and SPL were 27 points, 70 degrees, and 13 cm, respectively. The median follow-up was 15 months. The median postoperative IIEF-EF was 25 points (P < .001). The median residual penile curvature was 10 degrees (P < .001). The median postoperative SPL was 13 cm (P = .269). 8 patients (17.4%) lost 1 cm of SPL; no shortening greater than 1 cm was recorded. The median time to first satisfactory sexual intercourse and patient satisfaction score was 6 weeks and 9 points, respectively. Clinical Implications: Our results could pave the way for a new line of research, which in turn could lead to an improvement in the postoperative management of the patient undergoing surgery for PD. Strength & Limitations: This is the first study evaluating the ETT after PD surgery. The main limitation of this study is the lack of a randomized control group. Other weaknesses are the small sample size and the short follow-up time. Conclusion: Our novel penile splint is inexpensive, easy to assemble, and adaptable to the patient. ETT using this novel device, followed by standard traction therapy, seems to be feasible, effective, and safe. Copyright (C) 2020, International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/466789
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