The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2), responsible for the coronavirus disease COVID-19, was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Diabetes, as well as other cardiovascular comorbidities, has been recognized as a major risk factor for outcomes and mortality in adults with COVID-19, particularly in the elderly with type 2 diabetes. Based on these conclusions, COVID-19 data on adults have been generalized to youth with diabetes. Nevertheless, experience from pediatric diabetes practices in China (Wuhan), Italy, Spain (Catalonia), and the United States (San Francisco Bay Area) consistently report only a single severe case of COVID-19 in a 20-year-old female youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) that was hospitalized for bilateral pneumonia and was subsequently discharged without complications. In Italy, information on COVID-19 in all children with diabetes is collected on a weekly basis and those with positive swab test or infection-related symptoms reported to a dedicated national registry. Of a total of 15 500 children tested, 11 subjects with T1D (age 8-17y) tested positive for COVID-19; 6/11 were asymptomatic and the rest presented with mild symptoms. In the rest of locations, youths with T1D diagnosed with COVID-19 were based on clinical suspicion and a confirmatory PCR test (Wuhan:0; Catalonia-HSJD:3; California-Stanford:2). All of them were asymptomatic or had a mild course. We suggest that COVID-19 data from adults should not be generalized to children, adolescents, and youth with diabetes as their outcomes and prognosis seem to be similar to their non-diabetic-peers and consistently milder than adults with diabetes.

Children and youth with diabetes are not at increased risk for hospitalization due to COVID-19

Iafusco D.
Conceptualization
;
2021

Abstract

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2), responsible for the coronavirus disease COVID-19, was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Diabetes, as well as other cardiovascular comorbidities, has been recognized as a major risk factor for outcomes and mortality in adults with COVID-19, particularly in the elderly with type 2 diabetes. Based on these conclusions, COVID-19 data on adults have been generalized to youth with diabetes. Nevertheless, experience from pediatric diabetes practices in China (Wuhan), Italy, Spain (Catalonia), and the United States (San Francisco Bay Area) consistently report only a single severe case of COVID-19 in a 20-year-old female youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) that was hospitalized for bilateral pneumonia and was subsequently discharged without complications. In Italy, information on COVID-19 in all children with diabetes is collected on a weekly basis and those with positive swab test or infection-related symptoms reported to a dedicated national registry. Of a total of 15 500 children tested, 11 subjects with T1D (age 8-17y) tested positive for COVID-19; 6/11 were asymptomatic and the rest presented with mild symptoms. In the rest of locations, youths with T1D diagnosed with COVID-19 were based on clinical suspicion and a confirmatory PCR test (Wuhan:0; Catalonia-HSJD:3; California-Stanford:2). All of them were asymptomatic or had a mild course. We suggest that COVID-19 data from adults should not be generalized to children, adolescents, and youth with diabetes as their outcomes and prognosis seem to be similar to their non-diabetic-peers and consistently milder than adults with diabetes.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/458335
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 32
  • Scopus 52
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 52
social impact