Previous studies demonstrated that observation of facial expressions can modulate threat detection while looking at neutral or emotion-related scenes. Similarly, stimuli presented outside conscious awareness could influence social judgments of neutral novel stimuli. The two-fold aim of this study was: i) to evaluate whether observation of seen emotional faces could affect the judgment of social interactions without contextual cues (visible prime condition), and ii) whether this effect could also emerge when the emotional faces were made not visible by means of continuous flash suppression (invisible prime condition). We found that both seen and unseen faces are able to affect the judgment of ambiguous social interactions although this effect was particularly evident when affective faces were clearly visible. The present findings supported the idea that both conscious and unconscious processing of emotional faces have an important role in modulating perceivers' affective state and their judgment of social interactions.

Danger is in the eyes of the beholder: The effect of visible and invisible affective faces on the judgment of social interactions

Sagliano L.
;
Trojano L.
2020

Abstract

Previous studies demonstrated that observation of facial expressions can modulate threat detection while looking at neutral or emotion-related scenes. Similarly, stimuli presented outside conscious awareness could influence social judgments of neutral novel stimuli. The two-fold aim of this study was: i) to evaluate whether observation of seen emotional faces could affect the judgment of social interactions without contextual cues (visible prime condition), and ii) whether this effect could also emerge when the emotional faces were made not visible by means of continuous flash suppression (invisible prime condition). We found that both seen and unseen faces are able to affect the judgment of ambiguous social interactions although this effect was particularly evident when affective faces were clearly visible. The present findings supported the idea that both conscious and unconscious processing of emotional faces have an important role in modulating perceivers' affective state and their judgment of social interactions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/432542
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