Natural or synthetic small molecules (< 500 Da), bioactive at very low concentrations, can potentially increaseplant tolerance and resilience to abiotic stresses and improve the resources use efficiency (RUE) of a wide rangeof crops. Hence, they represent a promising tool in coping with the increasing global food demand imposed byclimate change. In this study, the responses of butterhead lettuce (cv. Trocadero) treated with omeprazole(OMP), a benzimidazole inhibitor of animal proton pumps, were studied. OMP was applied as substrate drench atfive rates (0, 10, 50, 100 or 200μM) on lettuce plants grown under nonsaline or saline conditions of 1 or30 mM NaCl. Increasing NaCl concentration decreased lettuce fresh and dry biomass by 37% and 25% in the0μM OMP treatment, respectively; whereas these reductions were mitigated by the 10μM (12% and 19%, re-spectively) and 50μM (15% and 14%, respectively) OMP application. Though OMP was not directly involved inion homeostasis and K+/Na+ratio regulation, treatment with 10μM OMP under saline conditions decreasedNa+in leaves and Cl−in leaves and roots while increasing NO3−concentration in both organs. The synthesis ofnitrogenous osmolytes may be implicated in increasing salt tolerance and the sustenance of transpiration andphotosynthesis. Under nonsaline conditions, OMP increased root biomass, improving nutrient and water uptake,and therefore RUE.

Natural or synthetic small molecules (<500 Da), bioactive at very low concentrations, can potentially increase plant tolerance and resilience to abiotic stresses and improve the resources use efficiency (RUE) of a wide range of crops. Hence, they represent a promising tool in coping with the increasing global food demand imposed by climate change. In this study, the responses of butterhead lettuce (cv. Trocadero) treated with omeprazole (OMP), a benzimidazole inhibitor of animal proton pumps, were studied. OMP was applied as substrate drench at five rates (0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 μM) on lettuce plants grown under nonsaline or saline conditions of 1 or 30 mM NaCl. Increasing NaCl concentration decreased lettuce fresh and dry biomass by 37% and 25% in the 0 μM OMP treatment, respectively; whereas these reductions were mitigated by the 10 μM (12% and 19%, respectively) and 50 μM (15% and 14%, respectively) OMP application. Though OMP was not directly involved in ion homeostasis and K+/Na+ratio regulation, treatment with 10 μM OMP under saline conditions decreased Na+in leaves and Cl−in leaves and roots while increasing NO3−concentration in both organs. The synthesis of nitrogenous osmolytes may be implicated in increasing salt tolerance and the sustenance of transpiration and photosynthesis. Under nonsaline conditions, OMP increased root biomass, improving nutrient and water uptake, and therefore RUE.

Morpho-physiological and homeostatic adaptive responses triggered by omeprazole enhance lettuce tolerance to salt stress

Petronia Carillo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
2019

Abstract

Natural or synthetic small molecules (< 500 Da), bioactive at very low concentrations, can potentially increaseplant tolerance and resilience to abiotic stresses and improve the resources use efficiency (RUE) of a wide rangeof crops. Hence, they represent a promising tool in coping with the increasing global food demand imposed byclimate change. In this study, the responses of butterhead lettuce (cv. Trocadero) treated with omeprazole(OMP), a benzimidazole inhibitor of animal proton pumps, were studied. OMP was applied as substrate drench atfive rates (0, 10, 50, 100 or 200μM) on lettuce plants grown under nonsaline or saline conditions of 1 or30 mM NaCl. Increasing NaCl concentration decreased lettuce fresh and dry biomass by 37% and 25% in the0μM OMP treatment, respectively; whereas these reductions were mitigated by the 10μM (12% and 19%, re-spectively) and 50μM (15% and 14%, respectively) OMP application. Though OMP was not directly involved inion homeostasis and K+/Na+ratio regulation, treatment with 10μM OMP under saline conditions decreasedNa+in leaves and Cl−in leaves and roots while increasing NO3−concentration in both organs. The synthesis ofnitrogenous osmolytes may be implicated in increasing salt tolerance and the sustenance of transpiration andphotosynthesis. Under nonsaline conditions, OMP increased root biomass, improving nutrient and water uptake,and therefore RUE.
Natural or synthetic small molecules (<500 Da), bioactive at very low concentrations, can potentially increase plant tolerance and resilience to abiotic stresses and improve the resources use efficiency (RUE) of a wide range of crops. Hence, they represent a promising tool in coping with the increasing global food demand imposed by climate change. In this study, the responses of butterhead lettuce (cv. Trocadero) treated with omeprazole (OMP), a benzimidazole inhibitor of animal proton pumps, were studied. OMP was applied as substrate drench at five rates (0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 μM) on lettuce plants grown under nonsaline or saline conditions of 1 or 30 mM NaCl. Increasing NaCl concentration decreased lettuce fresh and dry biomass by 37% and 25% in the 0 μM OMP treatment, respectively; whereas these reductions were mitigated by the 10 μM (12% and 19%, respectively) and 50 μM (15% and 14%, respectively) OMP application. Though OMP was not directly involved in ion homeostasis and K+/Na+ratio regulation, treatment with 10 μM OMP under saline conditions decreased Na+in leaves and Cl−in leaves and roots while increasing NO3−concentration in both organs. The synthesis of nitrogenous osmolytes may be implicated in increasing salt tolerance and the sustenance of transpiration and photosynthesis. Under nonsaline conditions, OMP increased root biomass, improving nutrient and water uptake, and therefore RUE.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/401964
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