BackgroundSeveral clinical and laboratory variables have an impact on the prognosis of STEMI patients undergoing PPCI; however, little is known about the role of ongoing DAPT at the time of the event and the smoking status as prognostic factors affecting the outcome of these patients.Methods and ResultsSeven-hundred and thirteen consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI, admitted to the S. Anna and S. Sebastiano Hospital (Caserta, Italy) and to the OLV Clinic (Aalst, Belgium), between March 2009 and December 2011, were retrospectively enrolled. Rescue PCI was the only exclusion criterion. Primary end-point was the combination of death for all causes, re-infarction, stroke, and target lesion revascularization (TLR). Patients already on DAPT at admission (26.4%) showed a significant increase in the event rate at univariate analysis (HR 2.34, CI 1.62-3.75, P<0.05), while current smokers (56.5%) had a lower event rate, as compared to non-smokers (HR 0.67, CI 0.46-0.96, P<0.05). In smoking patients already on DAPT at admission, a lower event rate was observed than in non-smoking patients on DAPT. Although, patients already on DAPT had a higher-risk profile (renal impairment, ongoing statin treatment, ST resolution <50%, and Killip class >1 were more frequently present than in patients not on DAPT), Cox regression analysis confirmed that both DAPT (HR 1.74, 95%CI 1.20-2.53, P<0.01) and smoking status (HR 0.69, 95%CI 0.48-1.00, P<0.05) retained their statistical significance, as they and were significantly associated with a worse and a better outcome, respectively, underlying their role as independent prognostic factors.ConclusionsNot being a current smoker and ongoing DAPT at admission, in patients with STEMI undergoing PPCI, represent independent negative prognostic value.

Prognostic Factors in Patients With Stemi Undergoing Primary PCI in the Clopidogrel Era: Role of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy at Admission and the Smoking Paradox on Long-Term Outcome

Cimmino, Giovanni;Golino, Paolo
2017

Abstract

BackgroundSeveral clinical and laboratory variables have an impact on the prognosis of STEMI patients undergoing PPCI; however, little is known about the role of ongoing DAPT at the time of the event and the smoking status as prognostic factors affecting the outcome of these patients.Methods and ResultsSeven-hundred and thirteen consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI, admitted to the S. Anna and S. Sebastiano Hospital (Caserta, Italy) and to the OLV Clinic (Aalst, Belgium), between March 2009 and December 2011, were retrospectively enrolled. Rescue PCI was the only exclusion criterion. Primary end-point was the combination of death for all causes, re-infarction, stroke, and target lesion revascularization (TLR). Patients already on DAPT at admission (26.4%) showed a significant increase in the event rate at univariate analysis (HR 2.34, CI 1.62-3.75, P<0.05), while current smokers (56.5%) had a lower event rate, as compared to non-smokers (HR 0.67, CI 0.46-0.96, P<0.05). In smoking patients already on DAPT at admission, a lower event rate was observed than in non-smoking patients on DAPT. Although, patients already on DAPT had a higher-risk profile (renal impairment, ongoing statin treatment, ST resolution <50%, and Killip class >1 were more frequently present than in patients not on DAPT), Cox regression analysis confirmed that both DAPT (HR 1.74, 95%CI 1.20-2.53, P<0.01) and smoking status (HR 0.69, 95%CI 0.48-1.00, P<0.05) retained their statistical significance, as they and were significantly associated with a worse and a better outcome, respectively, underlying their role as independent prognostic factors.ConclusionsNot being a current smoker and ongoing DAPT at admission, in patients with STEMI undergoing PPCI, represent independent negative prognostic value.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/385428
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