Background Doxorubicin (DOXO) is an effective anti-neoplastic drug but its clinical benefits are hampered by cardiotoxicity. Oxidative stress, apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis mediate the anthracycline cardiomyopathy. ROS trigger TGF-β pathway that activates cardiac fibroblasts promoting fibrosis. Myocardial stiffness contributes to diastolic dysfunction, less studied aspect of anthracycline cardiomyopathy. Considering the role of SIRT1 in the inhibition of the TGF-β/SMAD3 pathway, resveratrol (RES), a SIRT1 activator, might improve cardiac function by interfering with the development of cardiac fibrosis in a model of DOXO-induced cardiomyopathy. Methods F344 rats received a cumulative dose of 15 mg/kg of DOXO in 2 weeks or DOXO + RES (DOXO and RES, 2.5 mg/kg/day, concomitantly for 2 weeks and then RES alone for 1 more week). The effects of RES on cardiac fibroblasts were also tested in vitro. Results Along with systolic dysfunction, DOXO was also responsible of diastolic abnormalities. Myocardial stiffness correlated with fibroblast activation and collagen deposition. DOXO + RES co-treatment significantly improved ± dP/dt and, more interestingly, ameliorated end-diastolic pressure/volume relationship. Treatment with RES resulted in reduced fibrosis and fibroblast activation and, most importantly, the mortality rate was significantly reduced in DOXO + RES group. Fibroblasts isolated from DOXO + RES-treated rats, in which SIRT1 was upregulated, showed decreased levels of TGF-β and pSMAD3/SMAD3 when compared to cells isolated from DOXO-exposed hearts. Conclusions Our findings reveal a key role of SIRT1 in supporting animal survival and functional parameters of the heart. SIRT1 activation by interfering with fibrogenesis can improve relaxation properties of myocardium and attenuate myocardial remodeling related to chemotherapy. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved

SIRT1 activation attenuates diastolic dysfunction by reducing cardiac fibrosis in a model of anthracycline cardiomyopathy

Cappetta, Donato;PIEGARI, Elena;BERRINO, Liberato;ROSSI, Francesco;DE ANGELIS, Antonella;
2016

Abstract

Background Doxorubicin (DOXO) is an effective anti-neoplastic drug but its clinical benefits are hampered by cardiotoxicity. Oxidative stress, apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis mediate the anthracycline cardiomyopathy. ROS trigger TGF-β pathway that activates cardiac fibroblasts promoting fibrosis. Myocardial stiffness contributes to diastolic dysfunction, less studied aspect of anthracycline cardiomyopathy. Considering the role of SIRT1 in the inhibition of the TGF-β/SMAD3 pathway, resveratrol (RES), a SIRT1 activator, might improve cardiac function by interfering with the development of cardiac fibrosis in a model of DOXO-induced cardiomyopathy. Methods F344 rats received a cumulative dose of 15 mg/kg of DOXO in 2 weeks or DOXO + RES (DOXO and RES, 2.5 mg/kg/day, concomitantly for 2 weeks and then RES alone for 1 more week). The effects of RES on cardiac fibroblasts were also tested in vitro. Results Along with systolic dysfunction, DOXO was also responsible of diastolic abnormalities. Myocardial stiffness correlated with fibroblast activation and collagen deposition. DOXO + RES co-treatment significantly improved ± dP/dt and, more interestingly, ameliorated end-diastolic pressure/volume relationship. Treatment with RES resulted in reduced fibrosis and fibroblast activation and, most importantly, the mortality rate was significantly reduced in DOXO + RES group. Fibroblasts isolated from DOXO + RES-treated rats, in which SIRT1 was upregulated, showed decreased levels of TGF-β and pSMAD3/SMAD3 when compared to cells isolated from DOXO-exposed hearts. Conclusions Our findings reveal a key role of SIRT1 in supporting animal survival and functional parameters of the heart. SIRT1 activation by interfering with fibrogenesis can improve relaxation properties of myocardium and attenuate myocardial remodeling related to chemotherapy. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/355077
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