Although few experimental studies have been handled so far to exploit the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in the production of dry powders for antibiotic inhalation, there has been no comprehensive study on the role played by NP composition. In this work, we try to shed light on this aspect by designing and developing a pulmonary delivery system for antibiotics, such as tobramycin (Tb), based on PLGA NPs embedded in an inert microcarrier made of lactose, referred to as nano-embedded micro-particles (NEM). At nanosize level, helper hydrophilic polymers were used to impart the desired surface, bulk and release properties to PLGA NPs prepared by a modified emulsion-solvent diffusion technique. Results showed that poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (CS) are essential to optimise the size and modulate the surface properties of Tb-loaded PLGA NPs, whereas the use of alginate (Alg) allows efficient Tb entrapment within NPs and its release up to one month. Optimized formulations display good in vitro antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa planktonic cells. Furthermore, spray-drying of the NPs with lactose yielded NEM with peculiar but promising flow and aerosolization properties, while preserving the peculiar NP features. Nonetheless, in vivo biodistribution studies showed that PVA-modified Alg/PLGA NPs reached the deep lung, while CS-modified NPs were found in great amounts in the upper airways, lining lung epithelial surfaces. In conclusion, PLGA NP composition appears to play a crucial role in determining not only the technological features of NPs but, once processed in the form of NEM, also their in vitro/in vivo deposition pattern. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

Dry powders based on PLGA nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of antibiotics: Modulation of encapsulation efficiency, release rate and lung deposition pattern by hydrophilic polymers

D'ANGELO, Ivana;PERFETTO, Brunella;TUFANO, Maria Antonietta;
2012

Abstract

Although few experimental studies have been handled so far to exploit the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in the production of dry powders for antibiotic inhalation, there has been no comprehensive study on the role played by NP composition. In this work, we try to shed light on this aspect by designing and developing a pulmonary delivery system for antibiotics, such as tobramycin (Tb), based on PLGA NPs embedded in an inert microcarrier made of lactose, referred to as nano-embedded micro-particles (NEM). At nanosize level, helper hydrophilic polymers were used to impart the desired surface, bulk and release properties to PLGA NPs prepared by a modified emulsion-solvent diffusion technique. Results showed that poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (CS) are essential to optimise the size and modulate the surface properties of Tb-loaded PLGA NPs, whereas the use of alginate (Alg) allows efficient Tb entrapment within NPs and its release up to one month. Optimized formulations display good in vitro antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa planktonic cells. Furthermore, spray-drying of the NPs with lactose yielded NEM with peculiar but promising flow and aerosolization properties, while preserving the peculiar NP features. Nonetheless, in vivo biodistribution studies showed that PVA-modified Alg/PLGA NPs reached the deep lung, while CS-modified NPs were found in great amounts in the upper airways, lining lung epithelial surfaces. In conclusion, PLGA NP composition appears to play a crucial role in determining not only the technological features of NPs but, once processed in the form of NEM, also their in vitro/in vivo deposition pattern. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/330594
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