Indoor allergens represent an important precipitating factor for both asthma and atopic eczema dermatitis syndromes (AEDS). There is also accumulating evi- dence that sensitization to those allergens is associated with the onset of atopic disorders. Patients with AEDS present aeroallergen-specific T-cell responses associated with worsening of symptoms when exposed to specific aeroallergens. Furthermore, application of indoor allergens to the skin of patient with AEDS induces a local eczematous response in one-third of these patients. Exposure to high concentrations of mite allergens in early infancy have been demonstrated to be a risk factor for developing atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life. Moreover, a clear dose—response relationship has been documented between mite exposure and disease activity. Primary prevention of AEDS by avoiding indoor allergen exposure has been proved to be effective only when allergenic foods have also been avoided. Mite allergen avoidance in infants with AEDS and food allergy may however, prevent mite sensitization and the onset of asthma. Indoor allergen avoidance has been demonstrated to be eiiective in the majority of studies performed in patients with established AEDS. Negative results may be explained either by individual susceptibility variation. by long duration of dis- ease with the consequent irreversible pathological changes in the target tissue or by exposure to allergens outside the house. Education of the patients and public consciousness of the problems are crucial for the eiiicacy of indoor allergen avoidance in allergic diseases.

Environmental prevention in atopic eczema dermatitis syndrome (AEDS) and asthma: avoidance of indoor allergens

CAPRISTO, Carlo;
2004

Abstract

Indoor allergens represent an important precipitating factor for both asthma and atopic eczema dermatitis syndromes (AEDS). There is also accumulating evi- dence that sensitization to those allergens is associated with the onset of atopic disorders. Patients with AEDS present aeroallergen-specific T-cell responses associated with worsening of symptoms when exposed to specific aeroallergens. Furthermore, application of indoor allergens to the skin of patient with AEDS induces a local eczematous response in one-third of these patients. Exposure to high concentrations of mite allergens in early infancy have been demonstrated to be a risk factor for developing atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life. Moreover, a clear dose—response relationship has been documented between mite exposure and disease activity. Primary prevention of AEDS by avoiding indoor allergen exposure has been proved to be effective only when allergenic foods have also been avoided. Mite allergen avoidance in infants with AEDS and food allergy may however, prevent mite sensitization and the onset of asthma. Indoor allergen avoidance has been demonstrated to be eiiective in the majority of studies performed in patients with established AEDS. Negative results may be explained either by individual susceptibility variation. by long duration of dis- ease with the consequent irreversible pathological changes in the target tissue or by exposure to allergens outside the house. Education of the patients and public consciousness of the problems are crucial for the eiiicacy of indoor allergen avoidance in allergic diseases.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/235289
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