We report a patient who, following a focal ischemic lesion of the left basal ganglia, developed right hand micrographia characterised by progressive reduction of letter size during writing (progressive micrographia). The patient did not show relevant cognitive impairments, but achieved pathological scores in tests for verbal fluency, and cognitive flexibility and monitoring. A systematic investigation of the writing performances demonstrated that micrographia showed a clear length effect in whatever writing style or task, while it was not observed in drawing, or in left hand writing to a comparable extent. Right hand progressive micrographia was not affected by a concurrent motor and cognitive load; instead, switching between two kinds of allographic responses and presenting one letter at a time in copying tasks reduced severity of micrographia significantly. These findings support the view that progressive micrographia in our patient could be ascribed to a defect in regulating the motor output on the basis of self-generated strategies. This conclusion would be consistent with neuroimaging evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the control of motor sequencing, and could suggest that progressive micrographia might be associated with specific executive defects.

On the genesis of unilateral micrographia of the progressive type

GROSSI, Dario;CONSON, Massimiliano;TROJANO, Luigi
2007

Abstract

We report a patient who, following a focal ischemic lesion of the left basal ganglia, developed right hand micrographia characterised by progressive reduction of letter size during writing (progressive micrographia). The patient did not show relevant cognitive impairments, but achieved pathological scores in tests for verbal fluency, and cognitive flexibility and monitoring. A systematic investigation of the writing performances demonstrated that micrographia showed a clear length effect in whatever writing style or task, while it was not observed in drawing, or in left hand writing to a comparable extent. Right hand progressive micrographia was not affected by a concurrent motor and cognitive load; instead, switching between two kinds of allographic responses and presenting one letter at a time in copying tasks reduced severity of micrographia significantly. These findings support the view that progressive micrographia in our patient could be ascribed to a defect in regulating the motor output on the basis of self-generated strategies. This conclusion would be consistent with neuroimaging evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the control of motor sequencing, and could suggest that progressive micrographia might be associated with specific executive defects.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/232247
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