Human β-defensins play a pivotal role in the innate immune response. Although expressed by and acting at epithelial surfaces, little is known about their specific interaction with epithelial structures. Here, we identify the transmembrane protein CD98 as a cell surface receptor involved in the internalization of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in human epithelial A549 cells. CD98 and hBD3 extensively colocalize on the basolateral domain of A549. While verifying their direct binding by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance, we mapped the interaction to CD98 residues 304-414, i.e. to the region known to interact with the proteins of intestinal bacteria during colonic invasion. Treatment of A549 cells with hBD3 dramatically reduces CD98 expression and conversely, knockdown of CD98 expression impairs hBD3 cell surface binding and internalization. Competition for bacterial binding to CD98 and downregulation of CD98 expression may represent novel mechanisms for the antibacterial activity of hBD3

Human β-defensins play a pivotal role in the innate immune response. Although expressed by and acting at epithelial surfaces, little is known about their specific interaction with epithelial structures. Here, we identify the transmembrane protein CD98 as a cell surface receptor involved in the internalization of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in human epithelial A549 cells. CD98 and hBD3 extensively colocalize on the basolateral domain of A549. While verifying their direct binding by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance, we mapped the interaction to CD98 residues 304-414, i.e. to the region known to interact with the proteins of intestinal bacteria during colonic invasion. Treatment of A549 cells with hBD3 dramatically reduces CD98 expression and conversely, knockdown of CD98 expression impairs hBD3 cell surface binding and internalization. Competition for bacterial binding to CD98 and downregulation of CD98 expression may represent novel mechanisms for the antibacterial activity of hBD3.

Membrane protein 4F2/CD98 is a cell surface receptor involved in the internalization and trafficking of human β-defensin 3 in epithelial cells

Nigro E.;DANIELE, Aurora;
2015

Abstract

Human β-defensins play a pivotal role in the innate immune response. Although expressed by and acting at epithelial surfaces, little is known about their specific interaction with epithelial structures. Here, we identify the transmembrane protein CD98 as a cell surface receptor involved in the internalization of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in human epithelial A549 cells. CD98 and hBD3 extensively colocalize on the basolateral domain of A549. While verifying their direct binding by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance, we mapped the interaction to CD98 residues 304-414, i.e. to the region known to interact with the proteins of intestinal bacteria during colonic invasion. Treatment of A549 cells with hBD3 dramatically reduces CD98 expression and conversely, knockdown of CD98 expression impairs hBD3 cell surface binding and internalization. Competition for bacterial binding to CD98 and downregulation of CD98 expression may represent novel mechanisms for the antibacterial activity of hBD3
Human β-defensins play a pivotal role in the innate immune response. Although expressed by and acting at epithelial surfaces, little is known about their specific interaction with epithelial structures. Here, we identify the transmembrane protein CD98 as a cell surface receptor involved in the internalization of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in human epithelial A549 cells. CD98 and hBD3 extensively colocalize on the basolateral domain of A549. While verifying their direct binding by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance, we mapped the interaction to CD98 residues 304-414, i.e. to the region known to interact with the proteins of intestinal bacteria during colonic invasion. Treatment of A549 cells with hBD3 dramatically reduces CD98 expression and conversely, knockdown of CD98 expression impairs hBD3 cell surface binding and internalization. Competition for bacterial binding to CD98 and downregulation of CD98 expression may represent novel mechanisms for the antibacterial activity of hBD3.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/227521
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