The use of micrometeorological (MM) techniques for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) flux measurements in terrestrial ecosystems is increasing and a general outline which summarizes key results is needed. This work provides an overview of the current status of global flux measurements of CH4 and N2O by MM techniques in terrestrial ecosystems. Published studies were grouped into four main terrestrial land cover categories and the reported flux ranges, the consistency of different MM approaches over the same ecosystem types, the variability of the MM technique performances as regards the flux detection limit and environmental conditions, were analysed. Furthermore, the issue of the comparability between MM and soil chambers measurements was evaluated. The existing dataset, although temporally and spatially limited, shows that CH4 and N2O fluxes are extremely variable in both time and space with mean fluxes spanning within interquartile ranges of 1.33 divided by 5.45, 11.02 divided by 68.48, 5.38 divided by 29.28, 13.87.10(3) divided by 47.60.10(3) nmol CH4 m(-2) s(-1) in forest, wetlands, croplands and artificial lands respectively, and of 0.09 divided by 0.42, 0.24 divided by 1.47, 9.13 divided by 20.89 nmol N2O m(-2) s(-1) in forest, croplands and artificial lands (no published works were found for wetlands). When environmental conditions were comparable, a general agreement of flux ranges was found within each ecosystem type, in particular when estimates were based on accurate footprint analysis. Exceptions were mainly related to site-specific aspects or to particular measurement periods. Not all the measurement set-ups were suitable for all ecosystems, environmental conditions, turbulence characteristics and flux intensity, however the latest technological improvements make the detection of fluxes feasible virtually in all ecosystems. MM studies of CH4 and N2O fluxes were unevenly distributed around the globe and, in particular, were lacking in sensitive areas like Africa, South America and Central Asia. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The use of micrometeorological (MM) techniques for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) flux measurements in terrestrial ecosystems is increasing and a general outline which summarizes key results is needed. This work provides an overview of the current status of global flux measurements of CH4 and N2O by MM techniques in terrestrial ecosystems. Published studies were grouped into four main terrestrial land cover categories and the reported flux ranges, the consistency of different MM approaches over the same ecosystem types, the variability of the MM technique performances as regards the flux detection limit and environmental conditions, were analysed. Furthermore, the issue of the comparability between MM and soil chambers measurements was evaluated. The existing dataset, although temporally and spatially limited, shows that CH4 and N2O fluxes are extremely variable in both time and space with mean fluxes spanning within interquartile ranges of 1.33÷5.45, 11.02÷68.48, 5.38÷29.28, 13.87·103÷47.60·103nmolCH4m-2s-1 in forest, wetlands, croplands and artificial lands respectively, and of 0.09÷0.42, 0.24÷1.47, 9.13÷20.89nmolN2Om-2s-1 in forest, croplands and artificial lands (no published works were found for wetlands). When environmental conditions were comparable, a general agreement of flux ranges was found within each ecosystem type, in particular when estimates were based on accurate footprint analysis. Exceptions were mainly related to site-specific aspects or to particular measurement periods. Not all the measurement set-ups were suitable for all ecosystems, environmental conditions, turbulence characteristics and flux intensity, however the latest technological improvements make the detection of fluxes feasible virtually in all ecosystems. MM studies of CH4 and N2O fluxes were unevenly distributed around the globe and, in particular, were lacking in sensitive areas like Africa, South America and Central Asia. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

A literature overview of micrometeorological CH4 and N2O flux measurements in terrestrial ecosystems

CASTALDI, Simona;
2013

Abstract

The use of micrometeorological (MM) techniques for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) flux measurements in terrestrial ecosystems is increasing and a general outline which summarizes key results is needed. This work provides an overview of the current status of global flux measurements of CH4 and N2O by MM techniques in terrestrial ecosystems. Published studies were grouped into four main terrestrial land cover categories and the reported flux ranges, the consistency of different MM approaches over the same ecosystem types, the variability of the MM technique performances as regards the flux detection limit and environmental conditions, were analysed. Furthermore, the issue of the comparability between MM and soil chambers measurements was evaluated. The existing dataset, although temporally and spatially limited, shows that CH4 and N2O fluxes are extremely variable in both time and space with mean fluxes spanning within interquartile ranges of 1.33 divided by 5.45, 11.02 divided by 68.48, 5.38 divided by 29.28, 13.87.10(3) divided by 47.60.10(3) nmol CH4 m(-2) s(-1) in forest, wetlands, croplands and artificial lands respectively, and of 0.09 divided by 0.42, 0.24 divided by 1.47, 9.13 divided by 20.89 nmol N2O m(-2) s(-1) in forest, croplands and artificial lands (no published works were found for wetlands). When environmental conditions were comparable, a general agreement of flux ranges was found within each ecosystem type, in particular when estimates were based on accurate footprint analysis. Exceptions were mainly related to site-specific aspects or to particular measurement periods. Not all the measurement set-ups were suitable for all ecosystems, environmental conditions, turbulence characteristics and flux intensity, however the latest technological improvements make the detection of fluxes feasible virtually in all ecosystems. MM studies of CH4 and N2O fluxes were unevenly distributed around the globe and, in particular, were lacking in sensitive areas like Africa, South America and Central Asia. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
The use of micrometeorological (MM) techniques for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) flux measurements in terrestrial ecosystems is increasing and a general outline which summarizes key results is needed. This work provides an overview of the current status of global flux measurements of CH4 and N2O by MM techniques in terrestrial ecosystems. Published studies were grouped into four main terrestrial land cover categories and the reported flux ranges, the consistency of different MM approaches over the same ecosystem types, the variability of the MM technique performances as regards the flux detection limit and environmental conditions, were analysed. Furthermore, the issue of the comparability between MM and soil chambers measurements was evaluated. The existing dataset, although temporally and spatially limited, shows that CH4 and N2O fluxes are extremely variable in both time and space with mean fluxes spanning within interquartile ranges of 1.33÷5.45, 11.02÷68.48, 5.38÷29.28, 13.87·103÷47.60·103nmolCH4m-2s-1 in forest, wetlands, croplands and artificial lands respectively, and of 0.09÷0.42, 0.24÷1.47, 9.13÷20.89nmolN2Om-2s-1 in forest, croplands and artificial lands (no published works were found for wetlands). When environmental conditions were comparable, a general agreement of flux ranges was found within each ecosystem type, in particular when estimates were based on accurate footprint analysis. Exceptions were mainly related to site-specific aspects or to particular measurement periods. Not all the measurement set-ups were suitable for all ecosystems, environmental conditions, turbulence characteristics and flux intensity, however the latest technological improvements make the detection of fluxes feasible virtually in all ecosystems. MM studies of CH4 and N2O fluxes were unevenly distributed around the globe and, in particular, were lacking in sensitive areas like Africa, South America and Central Asia. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/193635
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