In the domain of self-recognition, voice is a critical feature for self/other distinction. The aim of this study was to explore if people have an implicit and/or explicit knowledge of their voice. A group of healthy participants were submitted to an implicit and an explicit self-voice recognition task. They listened to pairs of pre-recorded auditory stimuli (words or pseudowords) pronounced by themselves, by a familiar or an unfamiliar person. Afterwards, in the ‘‘Implicit task’’ participants had to judge whether the pair of stimuli were pronounced by same or different speakers; in the ‘‘Explicit task’’ they had to identify if one of the stimuli was or not their own voice. Results showed a difference between Implicit and Exp licit tasks since participants were more accurate in implicit than explicit self voice-recognition. Moreover, in the Implicit task, participants had the same level of accuracy when they had to judge stimuli pronounced with self or others’ voice, whereas when an explicit voice-recognition was required, they were less accurate with self than with others ’ voice.

Who is speaking? Implicit and explicit self and other voice recognition.

RUOTOLO, Francesco;IACHINI, Santa;
2014

Abstract

In the domain of self-recognition, voice is a critical feature for self/other distinction. The aim of this study was to explore if people have an implicit and/or explicit knowledge of their voice. A group of healthy participants were submitted to an implicit and an explicit self-voice recognition task. They listened to pairs of pre-recorded auditory stimuli (words or pseudowords) pronounced by themselves, by a familiar or an unfamiliar person. Afterwards, in the ‘‘Implicit task’’ participants had to judge whether the pair of stimuli were pronounced by same or different speakers; in the ‘‘Explicit task’’ they had to identify if one of the stimuli was or not their own voice. Results showed a difference between Implicit and Exp licit tasks since participants were more accurate in implicit than explicit self voice-recognition. Moreover, in the Implicit task, participants had the same level of accuracy when they had to judge stimuli pronounced with self or others’ voice, whereas when an explicit voice-recognition was required, they were less accurate with self than with others ’ voice.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/192760
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