The final step in the acceptance of a new medical hypothesis is often the approval of significant funding to investigate it. In the case of developmental programming (ie, the notion that the in utero environment determines suscep-tibility to many diseases later in life), this has recently come in the form of support by the US Congress for the National Children’s Study, a $3 billion project to follow the impact of environmental factors before, during, and after pregnancy on disease manifestation in some 100 000 children up to the age of 25 years.1 This initiative will, no doubt, yield a wealth of correlative data and identify many new factors potentially affecting developmental programming.

Impaired Fetal Growth, Cardiovascular Disease, and the Need to Move on

NAPOLI, Claudio
2008

Abstract

The final step in the acceptance of a new medical hypothesis is often the approval of significant funding to investigate it. In the case of developmental programming (ie, the notion that the in utero environment determines suscep-tibility to many diseases later in life), this has recently come in the form of support by the US Congress for the National Children’s Study, a $3 billion project to follow the impact of environmental factors before, during, and after pregnancy on disease manifestation in some 100 000 children up to the age of 25 years.1 This initiative will, no doubt, yield a wealth of correlative data and identify many new factors potentially affecting developmental programming.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/186312
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