Objective: To describe the evolution of robotic partial nephrectomy (PN) technique and to analyze the surgical outcomes in a large single institution experience. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of our institutional review boardapproved, prospectively maintained, minimally invasive PN database yielded 252 robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) procedures from June 2007 to October 2010. Our initial experience, adopted from our laparoscopic PN approach included a standard interrupted bolstered renorrhaphy, whereas our contemporary experience included a nonbolstered continuous horizontal mattress stitch for the capsular closure. Perioperative results were evaluated depending on renorrhaphy technique, length of warm ischemia time, and nephrometry scores. Results: Overall, mean tumor size was 3.1 ± 1.6 cm, operative time 190 ± 56 minutes, warm ischemia time 18.2 ± 9.4 minutes, and estimated blood loss 267 ± 275 mL. Significantly better outcomes were noted in the contemporary experience in terms of transfusion rate (8.2% vs 21.9%, P <.001), operative time (181 vs 219 minutes, P <.001), hospital stay (3.6 vs 4.3 days, P =.02), and complication rate (14.4% vs 33.8%, P <.01). Increasing tumor complexity based on RENAL score predicted longer operative time (P <.0001), warm ischemia time (P <.0001), and hospital stay (P <.04), and a greater risk of postoperative complications (P =.003). Of the series, only 2 patients had hemorrhagic complications (0.8%) requiring angioembolization, 4 patients developed urine leaks (1.5%), and 2 positive margins (0.8%) were noted. Conclusion: We report the largest single-institution study with RPN to date. Despite it being a relatively nascent procedure, initial results suggest that RPN is an effective approach for minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery. As experience is gained and the technique for RPN evolves, further improvement in outcomes will be noted. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

252 robotic partial nephrectomies: Evolving renorrhaphy technique and surgical outcomes at a single institution

AUTORINO, Riccardo;
2011

Abstract

Objective: To describe the evolution of robotic partial nephrectomy (PN) technique and to analyze the surgical outcomes in a large single institution experience. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of our institutional review boardapproved, prospectively maintained, minimally invasive PN database yielded 252 robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) procedures from June 2007 to October 2010. Our initial experience, adopted from our laparoscopic PN approach included a standard interrupted bolstered renorrhaphy, whereas our contemporary experience included a nonbolstered continuous horizontal mattress stitch for the capsular closure. Perioperative results were evaluated depending on renorrhaphy technique, length of warm ischemia time, and nephrometry scores. Results: Overall, mean tumor size was 3.1 ± 1.6 cm, operative time 190 ± 56 minutes, warm ischemia time 18.2 ± 9.4 minutes, and estimated blood loss 267 ± 275 mL. Significantly better outcomes were noted in the contemporary experience in terms of transfusion rate (8.2% vs 21.9%, P <.001), operative time (181 vs 219 minutes, P <.001), hospital stay (3.6 vs 4.3 days, P =.02), and complication rate (14.4% vs 33.8%, P <.01). Increasing tumor complexity based on RENAL score predicted longer operative time (P <.0001), warm ischemia time (P <.0001), and hospital stay (P <.04), and a greater risk of postoperative complications (P =.003). Of the series, only 2 patients had hemorrhagic complications (0.8%) requiring angioembolization, 4 patients developed urine leaks (1.5%), and 2 positive margins (0.8%) were noted. Conclusion: We report the largest single-institution study with RPN to date. Despite it being a relatively nascent procedure, initial results suggest that RPN is an effective approach for minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery. As experience is gained and the technique for RPN evolves, further improvement in outcomes will be noted. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/183137
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