This report summarizes a survey performed in eight countries on the status quo of daylight and electric lighting control systems. Feedback from more than 100 international experts (building / facility managers and planers) was evaluated. The aim of the survey was to identify the perception of the different possibilities of the current lighting control solutions and the expectations about the control systems. The survey aims to provide a mapping of the current lighting control systems available at the market and an overview of which functions are perceived as most important and which areas are found to be improved. Participants of the survey had to rank each question in relation to the perceived importance and the need for improvement. The survey enclosed five general topics; energy, operational aspects, occupant control, occupant comfort and control functionality. The findings from the summary suggest, that the two main reasons for the implementation of lighting control systems are: 1. The possibility to reduce the electric lighting consumptions and 2. The opportunity to increase the user’s well-being and thereby reduce complaints from the users. From a user perspective, this means that the lighting system must ensure visual acuity and comfort by providing a sufficient level of illuminance and the ability to regulate the light level. Always in relation to the task and the ambient light in the space, and thereby creating a pleasant and comfortable light environment. Research suggests, when giving the users some manual control possibilities, the satisfaction with the lighting conditions in general increases The users should be able to both increase and dim the light levels or completely turn it off. This suggests, if the lighting control system is designed to regulate the illuminance automatically, it should be provided some kind of manual override. This is supported by the findings in the surveys, where all countries in one way or another find it important to provide the users with some possibility of user control. This as well applies to the control of the shading system in relation to avoid glare from high daylight intensities and undesired solar radiation coming into the space. This increases the risk of overheating, resulting in an increased ventilation and/or cooling need leading to a higher energy use. However, in the two Scandinavian countries, it is found less important with the possibility to control the shadings in order to reduce glare from daylight and undesired heat transmission in the space. This may be due to the higher latitude and thereby a lower intensity of the daylight. In relation to the importance of user control, the findings additionally suggest, that the occupant control must be simple to operate. A control system which is easy for the users to understand intuitive, will most likely increase the chances of an ‘optimal’ interaction with the system. If the system does not meet the users need or is too complex to use, the possibility that the users will try to override the control systems increases, and this will most likely result in increased energy consumption.

Survey on opportunities and barriers in lighting controls

Michelangelo Scorpio;Sergio Sibilio;
2021

Abstract

This report summarizes a survey performed in eight countries on the status quo of daylight and electric lighting control systems. Feedback from more than 100 international experts (building / facility managers and planers) was evaluated. The aim of the survey was to identify the perception of the different possibilities of the current lighting control solutions and the expectations about the control systems. The survey aims to provide a mapping of the current lighting control systems available at the market and an overview of which functions are perceived as most important and which areas are found to be improved. Participants of the survey had to rank each question in relation to the perceived importance and the need for improvement. The survey enclosed five general topics; energy, operational aspects, occupant control, occupant comfort and control functionality. The findings from the summary suggest, that the two main reasons for the implementation of lighting control systems are: 1. The possibility to reduce the electric lighting consumptions and 2. The opportunity to increase the user’s well-being and thereby reduce complaints from the users. From a user perspective, this means that the lighting system must ensure visual acuity and comfort by providing a sufficient level of illuminance and the ability to regulate the light level. Always in relation to the task and the ambient light in the space, and thereby creating a pleasant and comfortable light environment. Research suggests, when giving the users some manual control possibilities, the satisfaction with the lighting conditions in general increases The users should be able to both increase and dim the light levels or completely turn it off. This suggests, if the lighting control system is designed to regulate the illuminance automatically, it should be provided some kind of manual override. This is supported by the findings in the surveys, where all countries in one way or another find it important to provide the users with some possibility of user control. This as well applies to the control of the shading system in relation to avoid glare from high daylight intensities and undesired solar radiation coming into the space. This increases the risk of overheating, resulting in an increased ventilation and/or cooling need leading to a higher energy use. However, in the two Scandinavian countries, it is found less important with the possibility to control the shadings in order to reduce glare from daylight and undesired heat transmission in the space. This may be due to the higher latitude and thereby a lower intensity of the daylight. In relation to the importance of user control, the findings additionally suggest, that the occupant control must be simple to operate. A control system which is easy for the users to understand intuitive, will most likely increase the chances of an ‘optimal’ interaction with the system. If the system does not meet the users need or is too complex to use, the possibility that the users will try to override the control systems increases, and this will most likely result in increased energy consumption.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/459697
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