Biologically effective dose markers –DNA and protein adducts- are classified among the exposure biomarkers, and nowadays they are used to assess the biologically active fraction of xenobiotics, able to interact with cellular macromolecules at the target site. Actually, macromolecular adducts can be considered not only as exposure indicators, but their biological significance can be extended also to biomarkers of effect and of susceptibility. The achievement of such a goal need research programs aimed both to study molecular mechanisms related to each steps along the continuum of events between exposure and disease, and to establish quantitative relationships between exposure levels and adducts formation, between adducts and early biological effects, effects and cellular structural/functional modifications, till the development and eventually the incidence increment of specific pathologies. Besides, different factors must be considered during data evaluation, such as: the interindividual variability, the background levels of biomarkers in non occupationally exposed population, the lower and lower doses of genotoxic agents involved in occupational exposures, confounding factors such as diet and smoking habits. Despite the large body of literature documenting DNA and protein adduct molecular dosimetry for many carcinogen exposures, many authors claimed the necessity of systematic interlaboratory comparisons and collaborations by measuring the same biomarkers with different techniques and/or different biomarkers related to the same exposure levels. There is also a general agreement in the need of validated and standardized analytical procedures without neglecting analytical times and costs, so that dosimetric analyses could be economically advantageous and accessible in all cases they prove to be useful in preventing health risks.

Indicatori di dose biologicamente efficace

MIRAGLIA, Nadia;SANNOLO, Nicola
2004

Abstract

Biologically effective dose markers –DNA and protein adducts- are classified among the exposure biomarkers, and nowadays they are used to assess the biologically active fraction of xenobiotics, able to interact with cellular macromolecules at the target site. Actually, macromolecular adducts can be considered not only as exposure indicators, but their biological significance can be extended also to biomarkers of effect and of susceptibility. The achievement of such a goal need research programs aimed both to study molecular mechanisms related to each steps along the continuum of events between exposure and disease, and to establish quantitative relationships between exposure levels and adducts formation, between adducts and early biological effects, effects and cellular structural/functional modifications, till the development and eventually the incidence increment of specific pathologies. Besides, different factors must be considered during data evaluation, such as: the interindividual variability, the background levels of biomarkers in non occupationally exposed population, the lower and lower doses of genotoxic agents involved in occupational exposures, confounding factors such as diet and smoking habits. Despite the large body of literature documenting DNA and protein adduct molecular dosimetry for many carcinogen exposures, many authors claimed the necessity of systematic interlaboratory comparisons and collaborations by measuring the same biomarkers with different techniques and/or different biomarkers related to the same exposure levels. There is also a general agreement in the need of validated and standardized analytical procedures without neglecting analytical times and costs, so that dosimetric analyses could be economically advantageous and accessible in all cases they prove to be useful in preventing health risks.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11591/176647
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