Objectives: The main goal of our research was to explore correlations between a history of uterine myomectomy and maternal-fetal outcomes, throughout a comparison between vaginal deliveries in patients with or without a history of uterine myoma excision. Materials and methods: A prospective study was carried out at two tertiary care hospitals between January 2019 and January 2020. Women were assigned into two groups according to the history of laparoscopic or laparotomic myomectomy (Group 1) or without myomectomy (Group 2). Results: 80 women successfully delivered after myomectomy. Pregnancies with previous laparoscopic or laparotomic myomectomy were associated with a minor rate of spontaneous labor onset (RR 1.17; 95% CI 1.04 − 1.31) and with an increased rate of emergency cesarean section (RR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09 − 1.36). Moreover, myomectomy group had a significant number of indications to emergency cesarean section correlated to suspected uterine rupture (RR 1.19; 95% CI 1.02–1.39). There were no uterine ruptures or neonatal deaths recorded. First stage of labor was longer in the myomectomy group (316 vs 204 mins, p = 0.01). No differences in the rates of the prolonged first and second stage of labor, postpartum hemorrhage and vaginal laceration, and no neonatal adverse outcomes were found between groups. Conclusions: Pregnancies after myomectomy might be associated with an elevated rate of emergency cesarean section only due to a higher percentage of suspected uterine rupture, without a real hazard of adverse obstetric or neonatal outcomes.

Is Uterine Myomectomy a Real Contraindication to Vaginal Delivery? Results from a Prospective Study

Cobellis L.;Torella M.;Morlando M.;Ambrosio D.;Colacurci N.;De Franciscis P.
2020

Abstract

Objectives: The main goal of our research was to explore correlations between a history of uterine myomectomy and maternal-fetal outcomes, throughout a comparison between vaginal deliveries in patients with or without a history of uterine myoma excision. Materials and methods: A prospective study was carried out at two tertiary care hospitals between January 2019 and January 2020. Women were assigned into two groups according to the history of laparoscopic or laparotomic myomectomy (Group 1) or without myomectomy (Group 2). Results: 80 women successfully delivered after myomectomy. Pregnancies with previous laparoscopic or laparotomic myomectomy were associated with a minor rate of spontaneous labor onset (RR 1.17; 95% CI 1.04 − 1.31) and with an increased rate of emergency cesarean section (RR 1.22; 95% CI 1.09 − 1.36). Moreover, myomectomy group had a significant number of indications to emergency cesarean section correlated to suspected uterine rupture (RR 1.19; 95% CI 1.02–1.39). There were no uterine ruptures or neonatal deaths recorded. First stage of labor was longer in the myomectomy group (316 vs 204 mins, p = 0.01). No differences in the rates of the prolonged first and second stage of labor, postpartum hemorrhage and vaginal laceration, and no neonatal adverse outcomes were found between groups. Conclusions: Pregnancies after myomectomy might be associated with an elevated rate of emergency cesarean section only due to a higher percentage of suspected uterine rupture, without a real hazard of adverse obstetric or neonatal outcomes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11591/442271
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